News Stories

  • Bentley Acquires Kevorkian Papers

    The University of Michigan Bentley Historical Library has acquired the papers of Dr. Jack Kevorkian, a controversial Detroit-area native best known for his advocacy of physician-assisted suicide and terminal patients’ “right to die.”

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  • A Wolverine at Gettysburg

    On the 152nd anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, the Bentley joins ranks with Charles Frederick Taylor, a U-M student who fought on the frontlines and became a hero. The story’s complementary images showcase Civil-War-related Bentley holdings.

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  • Former Congressman John Dingell Donates Archive to Bentley

    The Bentley is now the home for the papers, correspondence, bills, photographs and more from the longest-serving member of Congress in U.S. history.

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  • Live as Brothers, or Die as Fools

    MLK came to Ann Arbor to speak at U-M just once, in 1962. Rarely seen documents from the Bentley Historical Library shed light on the leader’s legendary visit.

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  • Ping Pong Diplomacy and Other Research Topics

    A host of exciting topics will be the subject of investigation by Bentley research fellows, the latest group of whom was awarded more than $10,000 in collective funds to study holdings at the Library.

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  • Online Registration Comes to the Bentley

    Our archives might be historical, but our registration system no longer is. On January 7, the Bentley will launch a new online registration system that offers users myriad benefits including the ability to request materials online and a streamlined duplication request process.

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  • Building a Culture of Sport on Campus

    A new Bentley exhibit showcases how Michigan built its athletic traditions beginning in 1860. In conjunction with U-M’s Sport and the University theme semester, the Bentley Historical Library is pleased to present a new exhibit, “Building a Culture of Sport on Campus.” For many of its earliest students, U-M could not be considered a great university… Complete Story